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Sultana bread

Close up of a wooden board with a sliced sultana loaf. Once slice buttered

This bread is (only) dotted with a few sultanas because our grandson isn’t a fan of them.  You can of course, add more (up to 100g more) if you like them, and you don’t have to change anything else in the recipe.

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Ingredients in my Sultana Bread

  • Sultanas: If you’ve done Bake Club Online, you’ll know I always rinse and nearly always soak my dried fruit, and you’ll understand why.  ?
  • Water: straight from the tap for the Thermomix method, we warm it to the perfect temperature when you follow the recipe.  Use warm water for the conventional method.  37°C is good.
  • Castor sugar: I use caster sugar for baking.  It dissolves quicker; it’s used here for sweetness and to help the yeast.
  • Dried Yeast: The one on the supermarket shelf.
  • Bakers flour:  Bakers flour will work best; we want those gluten strands to develop to achieve a light soft dough
  • Salt: Salt is there for flavour but mostly to control the yeast.  Don’t leave it out.
  • Bread improver or malt powder:  These ingredients are optional, but you will achieve better results using them.  I really like malt powder.  It gives food and a lovely colour to your bread.
  • Oil: I like to use olive oil here.  But use what you like.  It helps keep the dough and bread soft.
  • Egg: Egg enriches the dough and makes it softer.
  • Cinnamon: Here for a lovely flavour, of course.
Sultana loaf sitting on a cooling wrack
Cooling sultana bread

I’ve been chatting with my Facebook group this week about bread.    

Bread is easy once you have some experience under your belt.  Once you know what it should look (and maybe feel) like at each stage, you’ll be able to make all sorts.

I suppose if I can give you one piece of advice apart from “the more you make, the more confident you’ll be”, is that recipes for making bread are a whole lot of suggestions rather than rules. What I mean is that if it says to prove for an hour, it might be more or less depending on the temperature of your kitchen.  It’s what you’re looking to achieve at each stage that’s the most important thing. When it says double in size, it’s really hard to judge that, especially when you’ve usually got your dough in a bowl that’s smaller at the base than it is at the top.  What you’re looking for is a puffy lighter dough.

When a recipe says to bake at 180°C for 30 minutes, it might take a little less or longer depending on your oven and the tin you’ve used.   

You need to bake to gain experience; if it doesn’t work out well the first time, try and ascertain what has happened and make adjustments.  You’ll be an expert before you know it.

Most doughs should be soft and just under sticky; I like to call it tacky.

Proved is when you stick your finger in, and it springs back but leaves a small dent.  It shouldnt completely spring back, nor leave a big dent. (as this would indicate under or over proving).

Unproved dough in a tin.
680g tin Before proving

Tin size for Sultana Bread

I’ve used two tins when developing this recipe. Both tins are Mackies brand tins. 900g loaf or 680g loaf work well. Of course one is a lot higher than the other so it depends on how you like your bread. 😉

Unproved dough in a tin.
900g tin and 680g Mackies tins (proved and ready to bake )
Close up of a wooden board with a sliced sultana loaf. Once slice buttered

Bec’s Sultana Bread

5 from 7 votes

5 stars tells us you love the recipe

becs-table.com.au
This is a light and fluffy Sultana bread. Try it you'll love it.
Prep Time 2 hours
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 2 hours 30 minutes
Difficulty Medium
Course Afternoon Tea, Breakfast, Morning Tea
Cuisine European
Servings 12
Method Thermomix and Conventional

Equipment

  • Bread tin size: Either the Thermomix large bread tin with the lid or the 680g (next size down) Mackies tin.
  • Thermomix or Stand Mixer

Ingredients
  

  • 150 g sultanas
  • 240 g water warm for conventional
  • 20 g 1 tbsp castor sugar
  • 7 g 2 teaspoons Dried Instant Yeast
  • 520 grams bakers flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon bread improver or malt powder
  • 20 grams oil
  • 1 egg large
  • 3 tsp cinnamon

Instructions
 

Thermomix Method:

  • Weigh your sultanas into a bowl, cover with boiling water, allow them to soak for 5 minutes, then rinse and leave to drain. Set aside. Proceed with the rest of the recipe
  • Add the following ingredients to the Thermomix bowl in order 240 grams water, 20g (1 tbsp) castor sugar, 7 g (2 teaspoons), Dried Instant Yeast
  • Set the TM to warm 2 min/37°C/speed 2
  • Weigh the remainder of the ingredients into the TM bowl, 520 grams bakers flour, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon bread improver or malt powder, 20 grams oil, 1 egg (large), 3 tsp cinnamon, and add in the 150g Washed and drained sultanas
  • Knead 4 minutes “Dough mode” dough function.
  • Transfer the dough from the TM machine onto a clean bench, shape it into a ball, then place it in an oiled bowl & cover with a tea towel (or I like to use my Thermo server) Allow to prove for around 30 mins to 1 hour depending on kitchen temp. You’re looking for it to be puffy, not necessarily doubled in size. *see images.
  • Turn the dough out onto a clean bench. Cut into two equal portions, shape into two balls, then place them side by side in your bread tin.
  • Place your tin in a warm spot and prove until the dough is a few centimetres from the top of your bread large bread tin (the one with the lid) or just above the top for the next size down Mackies tin. *See notes
  • Optional. Brush with egg wash and sprinkle with sugar before placing in the oven.
  • Place in a preheated oven on 180°C fan forced for 25 mins – 30 minutes, or until deep golden brown.
  • Take out of the tin once cool enough to handle and leave to cool on a cooling rack.

Method Conventional.

  • Weigh your sultanas into a bowl, cover with boiling water, allow them to soak for 5 minutes, then rinse and leave to drain. Set aside. Proceed with the rest of the recipe
  • Mix all the dry ingredients together in a large bowl and make a well in the centre.
  • Add the lightly beaten egg to the well, almost all the warm water (holding back just a little to see if it’s needed), oil, and drained sultanas. Mix well to combine and add enough remaining water to make a moist, tacky dough.
  • Turn out onto a lightly floured knead for 5 minutes or so, form into a ball, cover the dough and leave to double in size. (until its puffy)
  • Turn the dough out onto a clean bench. Cut into two equal portions, shape into two balls, then place them side by side in your bread tin.
  • Place your tin in a warm spot and prove until the dough is a few centimetres from the top of your bread large bread tin (The one with the lid) or just above the top for the next size down Mackies tin. *See notes
  • Optional. Brush with egg wash and sprinkle with sugar before placing in the oven.
  • Place in a preheated oven on 180°C fan forced for 25 mins – 30 minutes, or until deep golden brown.
  • Take out of the tin once cool enough to handle and leave to cool on a cooling rack.

Want to know more?

I’ve got another recipe that uses sourdough or a poolish that you can make really quickly. French baguettes. They’re so good and easy to make.

Would you like to learn how to make Easy Overnight Sourdough?

Easy Overnight Sourdough

8 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    I made this yesterday, but added half of the raisins whole after the knead. Absolutely perfect, great recipe thanks so much Bec!

  2. This has a lovely taste. Last time I made it the dough stuck to my tin! I’m making it again this morning and will be a lot more careful. I plan to add some flaked almonds as well.

    1. Nice one, Jean. I love to add nuts to my bakes. I’m just wondering if you may have put your loaf tin in the dishwasher? I don’t put my baking tins in the dishwasher; if they’ve got any coating or built-up patina, you lose it in there.

      1. 5 stars
        Would you believe I don’t have a dishwasher? My husband is mine. I rarely even wash my bread tins. I do if it’s necessary but otherwise just give them a ‘shine’. They are no longer things of beauty. ???

  3. 5 stars
    I love how you add comments to each ingredient, Bec. Adds so much value. Thanking you very much.

5 from 7 votes (4 ratings without comment)

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