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Pecan and Caramilk Ganache Skillet Scrolls

A cast iron skillet with Carmamilk and Pecan scrolls

I had so much fun developing this recipe for Pecan and Caramilk Ganache Skillet Scrolls. My aim was for sticky, sweet, light, airy buns,w that taste as if they’ve come from your favourite bakery. I think I’ve nailed it. Pecans and Caramilk Ganache in a scroll, what more could a girl want???

Why do you need a cast iron skillet?

  • Apart from making these? If you’re sick of throwing out cheap non-stick pans, these cast iron skillets really do last forever.  Even if you abuse them a bit, you can still bring them back to life. 
  • These cast iron skillets from Lodge are seasoned before you get them, so they’re ready to use when they arrive.  Seasoning is the term used for baking the oil onto the surface of the pan. After doing this, your skillet will have that classic black patina look. A well-seasoned cast-iron pan can last for generations. Got to love that!
  • They heat up so well that you can caramelize food like a chef.  These skillets are brilliant for cooking meat.
  • They’re non-stick, and they stay that way if you know how to look after them. If they show any signs of sticking, you can quickly bring that non-stick patina back.
  • Yes, you can use them on any stovetop, including induction, and even on a campfire.
  • You can take them straight from your stovetop to your oven.  Some pans that can do this have really long handles, but the lodge pan has a short handle, so it will easily fit in your oven.  
  • You can use any utensils you want on these pans without any fear. 
  • Even though you can’t stick them in the dishwasher, they’re easy to look after. Wash with warm water and a brush. Add a little dishwashing liquid if need be. Dry promptly, and whip over with a touch of oil — that’s it.  (I like to dry mine on the stovetop. A few seconds of heat and ta-da! Or if your oven is cooling down, stick it in there)
  • The only coating on this Lodge 26cm skillet is the black patina left from the seasoning with oil.  
  • Made in one piece (handle and all), they are virtually unbreakable.  I say virtually because if you were to smash them against a rock, you might have trouble. 😉  
Pecan and caramilk scrolls in a iron skillet.
Pecan and caramilk scrolls (in a iron skillet)

Ingredients used in this Caramilk scroll recipe:

  • Instant yeast, you can grab this from any supermarket.
  • Bakers flour (bread flour) is best for this recipe, so we get a good rise and texture.
  • Caster sugar is excellent for a recipe like this. The crystals are tiny and a regular size, so they quickly and evenly dissolve. 
  • I love flaked salt.  In fact, that’s all I use.  I purchase Murray Valley Pink Salt Flakes, but there are many to choose from choose one you like. 
  • It’s best to use unsalted butter in baked goods. This way, you have control over how much salt is in the recipe.  It has to be soft (or grated), so it will combine nicely when you add it. 
  • I purchase extra-large free-range eggs. You’ll need 3-4 of them to make up your 160g of weight.  A pastry chef always uses weights to measure all their ingredients so we have consistent results.  Crack them, whisk them a bit, then weigh the amount needed. 
  • Malted milk powder drink” is made by Nestle, or if you can’t get it, you can use Horlicks. If you don’t have either or don’t want to purchase it, you can use plain milk powder)
  • Caramilk is a Cadbury confection. If you don’t have this or don’t like it, no problem, use any other kind of chocolate. 
  • The cream is used to loosen up the warm Caramilk or chocolate to make it easy to spread.
  • I love pecans and toasted with these caramel flavours; they’re amazing.  Don’t chop them too small; you want to be able to see them.
  • Brown sugar is used to make the saucy topping along with some unsalted butter.
  • Adding a pinch of salt and some freshly squeezed lemon juice to the caramel pecan sauce will cut through the sweetness and highlight the flavours.  It will also help make the sauce a bit more pourable.

Step by Step for the Caramilk scroll recipe:

  • Make your dough and allow it to prove
  • While the dough is proving, make the filling and topping
  • Roll the dough into a rectangle
  • Spread the filling
  • Fold the dough to enclose the filling and slice
  • Twist and pop into the skillet
  • Top with the topping
  • Bake until golden.
Step by Step Caramilk Pecan Scrolls

FAQ:

How can I stop my scrolls from browning too much?

Cover the top with a baking-paper lined foil cap once the buns are golden brown.

How can I tell if my scrolls are cooked through?

The best way is by experience, but it can be difficult to tell when you’re making a new recipe.  If you have a temperature probe, you can check the internal temperature, and once it reaches 90°C (194°F), it’s done. Tapping the bottom of a loaf is usually a good indicator, but not in this case, as you may get burnt with sticky toffee.

Classes if you are local (Melbourne) or Zooms from anywhere 🙂
Why are my scrolls doughy in the centre?

You may not have baked them long enough; they should take around 40 – 50 minutes.  See “How can I stop my buns from browning too much?” The other reason could be that you’ve cut them before they’ve cooled.  Cutting any bread before it’s cooled will cause the centre to be tacky. I know it’s hard to be patient when things look and smell so good, but wait till it’s fully cooled, and you will be rewarded.

Do I have to use nuts?

Of course, you can leave them out if need be. Just follow the recipe, omitting the nuts.

Do you have to cut and fold these shapes?

Nope, not at all. You can make them in regular scroll shapes if you like or even in a loaf tin.  Make the syrup mix in a pot on the stove and pour it over the loaf before baking. 

YouTube video
If you’re having trouble working out how to shape your dough, here’s a video for you

So you like scrolls, maybe you want to try these?

  • There are these biscuits, I’m sure you’ll remember these Arnott’s biscuits. They’re called Coffee scrolls but there’s no coffee in them and they’re super easy to make.
  • There’s also a more traditional recipe for Coffee Scrolls with an almond and cinnamon filling. We like these at our place.
  • Here’s another memory from when I was a child – the finger bun. I remember my Nan buying these and adding cream inside. She did love whipped cream. ??
  • Of course these days we’re all into making sourdough at home, I’ve added a brilliant recipe for sourdough scrolls in my Easy overnight Sourdough course. These are so easy.
A cast iron skillet with Carmamilk and Pecan scrolls

Pecan and Caramilk Ganache Skillet Scrolls

4.75 from 4 votes

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becs-table.com.au
These are sticky, sweet and totally irresistible. Make a batch and they won't disappoint.
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Total Time 2 hours 35 minutes
Difficulty Medium
Course Afternoon Tea, Dessert, Morning Tea
Cuisine Australian
Servings 7
Method Thermomix and Conventional

Equipment

  • 1 Large cast Iron Skillet 26cm

Ingredients
  

For the Dough:

  • 15 g instant yeast 1 Aussie Tbsp
  • 150 g water or more if needed
  • 550 g bakers flour
  • 60 g caster Sugar
  • 10 g salt or 2 tsp flaked salt
  • 120 g unsalted butter soft or grated
  • 160 g eggs you will need 3-4 extra-large — crack eggs whisk and weigh
  • 50 g malted milk drink powder or just plain milk powder

For the Ganache filling:

  • 120 g Caramilk or other chocolate
  • 30 g cream

For the Pecan topping:

  • 50 g pecans roughly chopped
  • 60 g soft brown sugar
  • 35 g unsalted butter cut into cubes
  • 1 pinch salt flaked good quality, I use Murray Valley Pink Salt Flakes
  • 30 g juice of a lemon

Instructions
 

Conventional and Thermomix Methods listed below

    For The Dough:

    • Weigh warm water (around 37°C body temp) into the mixing bowl of a stand mixer, then add the dried yeast. Mix with a fork to combine, then cover with a tea towel and rest for around 5mins.
    • Weigh the remainder of the ingredients into the stand mixer bowl in the order they are listed.
    • If you have a dough hook, use that. If not, use the paddle attachment and set it on a medium-slow speed until combined, then medium speed for around 8 – 10 minutes.
    • Once the time is up, the mix will be sticky but shouldn’t be sticky enough to stick all over your hands. Remove it from the bowl and give it a little bit of a knead on the bench to bring it into a ball. Lightly oil your mixing bowl, then set the dough ball back into the base and cover with a tea towel or cling film. Set in a warm place prove for 1 – 1.5 hours until doubled in size.
    • While the dough is proving, get on with the ganache and sticky pecan topping.

    For the Caramilk Ganache:

    • Chop the Caramilk (or chocolate) into small pieces and place them into a microwave-safe bowl.
    • Add the cream to the chopped Caramilk and place it in the microwave for 10 seconds. Remove and stir, pop it back in the microwave and repeat with 10 then 5-second bursts until the Caramilk is all melted. Then set aside to cool and firm so you can spread it on the dough later.

    For the Sticky Pean Topping:

    • Get all your ingredients ready.
    • Place the sugar, butter and nuts into your skillet and heat until the butter has melted. Once everything is hot and the butter is bubbling, turn off the heat.
    • Next add the lemon juice and salt; the lemon juice may sputter slightly, so stand back. Stir this around to combine, then remove most of the mix from the skillet leaving behind just a touch, so the base of your scrolls are golden and sticky. Set the rest aside for later.

    Back to the dough:

    • Once your dough has doubled in size, it should be soft and a little sticky but not stick to your hands after you’ve given it a little knead. Remove from the bowl and punch down, give it a little knead to bring it together into a smooth dough ball, then leave it to bench rest for 10 minutes.
    • Roll out the dough with a rolling pin until you have around a 40 x 30 cm rectangle.
    • Spread the Caramilk ganache over the surface of the dough, then fold the dough in 3 (a letter fold). Then slice the dough into 7 strips.
    • Take one rectangle at a time and slice it down the centre lengthways about 3/4 of the way down the length of the strip; place one dough strip in front of you on your work surface, and holding each end of the cut strips simultaneously, gently twist the dough, so it looks like rope. Like you would if you were plaiting. Now twist it around, shape it into a ball, and place it in the skillet. Continue with the rest of the dough.
    • Once you’ve got all the dough in the skillet, spoon dollops of 3/4 of the pecan mix you made earlier onto the top, cover with foil and set aside to prove. You only need to prove this time for around 30- minutes.
    • Set the oven to 180°C; once at temperature, place the skillet in the oven and drop the temperature to 170°C.
    • Continue to bake until golden and cooked through. If it starts to brown too much, pop that tinfoil back on top to shield it. Mine took 40 mins in total to bake in my home oven, although I added a baking paper-lined foil cap around the 20-30-minute mark to prevent over-browning and drying out. *See tips
    • Once the scrolls are cooked through, remove them from the oven; use a pastry brush to brush over the remainder of the sticky caramel while they’re still piping hot.
    • Serve when cooled, if you can wait. 😉

    Thermomix Method :

      For The Dough:

      • Weigh the water and yeast into the TM bowl, lid on, MC in. set 3 min/37°C/speed 1. Once the time is up, leave the lid on for 5 minutes before continuing.
      • Weigh the remainder of the ingredients into the TM bowl in the order they’re listed. With the MC in place, set the TM to mix 10 sec/speed 5.
      • Now, set the TM to knead for 4 minutes; watch your TM while it’s kneading; they like to walk sometimes. 😉
      • Once the time is up, remove the dough from the TM bowl, pop it into a lightly oiled bowl. The dough will be very sticky, don’t panic. A thermoserver or similar or just a bowl with cling film on top will be fine. Leave to rest for 1 – 1.5 hours or until doubled in size. (*you can leave it in the bowl but, see tips)
      • While the dough is proving, get on with the ganache and sticky pecan topping.

      For the Caramilk Ganache:

      • Chop the Caramilk (or chocolate) into small pieces and weigh it into the TM bowl. Weigh in the cream and set for 3 min/50°C/speed 1. Scrape down and stir if needed. Once the time is up, remove the ganache, place it in a small bowl, and pop it aside to spread later.

      For the Sticky Pecan Topping:

      • Get all your ingredients ready.
      • Place the sugar, butter and nuts into your skillet and heat until the butter has melted. Once everything is hot and the butter is bubbling, turn off the heat.
      • Next, add the lemon juice and salt; the lemon juice may sputter slightly, so stand back. Stir this around to combine, then remove most of the mix from the skillet leaving behind just a touch, so the base of your scrolls are golden and sticky. Set the rest aside for later.

      Back to the dough:

      • Once your dough has doubled in size, it should be soft and a little sticky but not stick to your hands after you’ve given it a little knead. Remove from the bowl and punch down, give it a little knead to bring it together into a smooth dough ball, then leave it to bench rest for 10 minutes.
      • Roll out the dough with a rolling pin until you have around a 40 x 30 cm rectangle.
      • Spread the Caramilk ganache over the surface of the dough, then fold the dough in 3 (a letter fold). Then slice the dough into 7 strips.
      • Take one rectangle at a time and slice it down the centre lengthways about 3/4 of the way down the length of the strip; place one dough strip in front of you on your work surface, and holding each end of the cut strips simultaneously, gently twist the dough, so it looks like rope. Like you would if you were plaiting. Now twist it around, shape it into a ball, and place it in the skillet. Continue with the rest of the dough.
      • Once you’ve got all the dough in the skillet, spoon dollops of 3/4 of the pecan mix you made earlier onto the top, cover with foil and set aside to prove. You only need to prove this time for around 30- minutes.
      • Set the oven to 180°C fan; once at the temperature, place the skillet in the oven and drop the temperature to 170°C fan.
      • Continue to bake until golden and cooked through. If it starts to brown too much, pop that tinfoil back on top to shield it. Mine took 40 mins in total to bake in my home oven, although I added a baking paper-lined foil cap around the 20-30-minute mark to prevent over-browning and drying out. *See tips
      • Once the scrolls are cooked through, remove them from the oven; use a pastry brush to brush over the remainder of the sticky caramel while they're still piping hot.
      • Serve when cooled, if you can wait. 😉

      Notes

      Bec’s Tips:
      Please read the whole recipe first; it’s not difficult once you know what is ahead of you.
      Use unsalted butter for superior flavour and add salt where recommended.
      When softening the butter, it’s best not to completely melt it either let it come to room temperature before using or grate it so it combines easily.
      Milk is excellent to use in sweet doughs. It tenderises the crumb but using malted milk powder will also give a wonderful flavour.
      You can leave your dough in the TM bowl to prove, but you’ll need it to make your ganache. If you have two bowls, you can use them both. 😉
      How can you tell when it’s cooked? The top should be deep golden brown; if you have a temperature probe, the temperature in the centre of the dough should have an internal temperature of 90°C (194°F). The usual way would be to tap the base; I don’t recommend doing that with this one; it will be very hot and sticky.
      For this recipe, I used the Lodge Cast Iron 26cm Skillet, its available as part of the Everten cookware range.

      4 Comments

      1. Hi Bec, I have been looking at the lodge skillet online, they look really good. What size skillet did u use? Thanks ?

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