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Fig Rolls

Baking tray filled with Fig roll biscuits

It seems that I’m on a mission to create every last Arnott’s biscuit that I’ve ever eaten (or perhapos has eve been made).  I’ve been thinking about Arnott’s fig rolls for a while.  I thought they might be difficult, but you know what, they’re not that bad with these few tips thrown in.

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I made them in the Thermomix, because quite frankly, it’s the easiest way. However I’ve added the conventional method for those who don’t own one. First, make the biscuit base, roll it out, cover in cling film, then chill, then go on with making the filling.  The filling needs to be cooked, then left to cool and firm up in the fridge.

The filling has to be cold before you get on with the assembly.  So I opted to make the two components one day and finished them off the next.  Of course, you can do all this to make your fig rolls in just one day, but I don’t know; it seems like they come together so much quicker and easier if you do it over two days.

Baking tray filled with Fig roll biscuits

Bec’s Fig Rolls

4.75 from 8 votes

5 stars tells us you love the recipe

becs-table.com.au
My Nan used to buy these. She loved them. This is my version of the fig roll recipe from the Arnott's biscuit company.
Prep Time 45 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Difficulty Medium
Course Biscuits
Cuisine Australian
Servings 12
Method Thermomix and Conventional

Equipment

  • 1 Thermomix or Food Processor

Ingredients
  

  • For the biscuit base:
  • 180 g plain flour
  • 1 pinch of salt I like flaked
  • ¼ teaspoon of baking powder
  • 35 g brown sugar
  • 50 g unsalted butter
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp vanilla

For the filling

  • 200 g dried figs chopped into quarters
  • 35 g brown sugar
  • 15 g mixed peel
  • 1 teaspoon of my sweet warming spice or ½ teaspoon cinnamon and ½ teaspoon mixed spice
  • 20 g of dried ginger pieces crystallised or uncrystallised. Chopped fine
  • 70 g water in the Thermomix or enough to just cover the mixture on the stovetop.

Instructions
 

Thermomix Method:

    For the biscuit base: Ready the whole recipe first

    • Weigh all the biscuit base dry ingredients into the TM bowl MC in, set for 5 sec/speed 6.
    • Add the cold cubes of butter to the TM bowl and set for 10 sec/speed 6.
    • Add the vanilla and egg to the TM bowl and mix for 5 sec/speed 6.
    • Tip the contents from the TM bowl onto some cling film and bring it together. Wrap and chill for around 30 minutes or overnight. (If you leave it overnight, remove it from the fridge 10 – 15 mins working with it, making it easier to roll out).
    • Give the bench a very light dusting of flour and roll out the base until you have a rectangle around 25cm x 20 cm. Or, if you’ve done my pastry course, use the easy cling film method I’ve shown in the videos.
    • Cover the biscuit base with cling film, then place on a baking sheet and rest in the fridge until it’s time for assembly. (this is where I left it overnight)

    Thermomix Method for the Filling:

    • Without washing the TM bowl, weigh in all the ingredients listed for the filling. Make sure those fig pieces are not too big; I like to respect the blades, so I don’t have to replace them too often.
    • With the lid on and MC in place, set the TM for 15 min/95°C/speed 1.
    • Once the time is up, blitz the mix for 10 sec/speed 6, scrape down ½ way through if need be. Then place in a small bowl and set it in the fridge to chill. (The filling was also left overnight)
    • Once chilled, the mix should be quite stiff, firm enough to be rolled into a sausage.

    Assembly:

    • Remove the rolled out biscuit dough from the fridge and allow it to sit for 5-10 minutes so it’s easier to work with. Then trim the sides and slice down the middle lengthways. Yep, I used a metal ruler to make it neat. Set this aside on a sheet of clingfilm.
    • Take the fig filling from the fridge and portion it into two.
    • Lightly dust your bench and your hands, then roll each portion into a long sausage measuring the same length as your biscuit base 25cm. Pop the fig sausage on top of your biscuit base and roll up using the clingfilm to help shape it. I didn’t need to use anything to close up the seam, but if yours isn’t sticking when gently pressed, use a little water brushed on the seam.
    • Repeat with the second length. Press the sausage down as you would a sausage roll, then using a sharp knife, cut each sausage into 6. Yep used that ruler again!
    • Gently place your fig rolls onto a lined baking tray (or straight onto a USA pan or good quality non-stick pan; no need to line). Pop the tray into the fridge to chill while the oven comes to temperature.
    • Set the oven to 170°C fan-forced. (340°F fan-forced)
    • Bake until you start seeing some signs of colour on the cookie dough. Mine took 15 minutes on a flat tray in the centre position of my oven.

    Conventional Method:

      For the biscuit base: Ready the whole recipe first

      • Weigh all the biscuit base dry ingredients into a food processor, add the cool cubes of butter and mix until well combined. (Stop mixing when it looks like bread crumbs)
      • Add the vanilla and egg to the processor and blend until the mixture comes together as a dough.
      • Remove from the processor and bring together on a clean bench. Wrap in plastic and chill for around 30 minutes, or leave overnight. If you chill overnight, remove it from the fridge 10 – 15 min or so before you want to roll it out.
      • Give the bench a very light dusting of flour and roll out the base until you have a rectangle around 25cm x 20 cm. Or, if you’ve done my pastry course, use the easy cling film method I’ve shown in the videos.
      • Place the rolled out biscuit base on a tray cover with cling film, and rest in the fridge until it’s time for assembly. (this is where I left mine overnight)

      Conventional Method for the Filling:

      • Weigh all the ingredients listed for the filling into a pot on the stove, add some water, just enough to cover the ingredients and cook until soft. Keep an eye on the liquid levels. You don’t want your mix to burn, so you may need to add a bit more water as you go.
      • Once the filling ingredients have softened, (and quite thick) allow it to cool before adding to a food processor, blend until it becomes a paste. You should still see fig seed so try not to overdo it.
      • Place in a small bowl and set it in the fridge to chill. (The filling was also left overnight)
      • Once chilled, the mix should be quite stiff, firm enough to be rolled into a sausage.

      Assembly:

      • Remove the rolled out biscuit dough from the fridge and allow it to sit for 5-10 minutes so it’s easier to work with. Then trim the sides and slice down the middle lengthways. Yep, I used a metal ruler to make it neat. Set this aside on a sheet of clingfilm.
      • Take the fig filling from the fridge and portion it into two.
      • Lightly dust your bench and your hands, then roll each portion into a long sausage measuring the same length as your biscuit base 25cm. Pop the fig sausage on top of your biscuit base and roll up using the clingfilm to help shape it. I didn’t need to use anything to close up the seam, but if yours isn’t sticking when gently pressed, use a little water brushed on the seam.
      • Repeat with the second length. Press the sausage down as you would a sausage roll, then using a sharp knife, cut each sausage into 6. Yep used that ruler again!
      • Gently place your fig rolls onto a lined baking tray. Pop the tray into the fridge to chill while the oven comes to temperature.
      • Set the oven to 170°C fan-forced. (340°F fan-forced)
      • Bake until you start seeing some signs of colour on the cookie dough. Mine took 15 minutes on a flat tray in the centre position of my oven.

      Want to know more?

      There are loads of Arnott’s classic biscuits that we’ve developed recipes for, here are a few…

      2 Comments

      1. I’m So making this. I tasted a date version and ohh, it is so incredibly addictive but craving the flavor of fennel seeds to go with figs for my son bought lots of them 😅 the reason I came here. And I’m replacing cinnamon with fennel seeds adding a touch of cardamom. You know, there’s a Lebanese fig jam made with a touch of mastic for fragrant jam? But not sure am up for mixing lots of flavors in this. Keeping it simple for now. Thank for sharing your recipe. Much appreciated. Have a delightful time. 👋🏻

      4.75 from 8 votes (8 ratings without comment)

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