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Blackberry ripple loaf

A close up showing the inside of a sliced blackberry ripple loaf

A blackberry ripple loaf is pretty easy to make and can be made with any kind of berry. For example, our Raspberry Loaf. A mix of berries also works well, and by using frozen fruit, you can make this all year round.

In the recipe below, I’ve mentioned that I have a tip for when a loaf starts to brown too much on top, but is not yet cooked through.  If you’ve been to Bake Club or any of my classes, you know I have loads of tips; in fact, just try and shut me up 🙂

Classes if you are local (Melbourne) or Zooms from anywhere 🙂

Whats the difference between a loaf and a cake?

Why do we use different terms like “loaves” or “cake,” even though they often seem to have similar tastes and textures. The difference is mostly about their shape and how they’re baked. Loaf cakes are usually baked in a rectangular loaf pan. While cakes might be baked in round or square tims, and may have multiple layers. Even though they may taste similar, it’s their appearance and baking method that tends to set them apart.

How to prevent cakes from burning

For any cake that’s starting to brown too much on the top, make a shower cap.  Most people just take tin foil and grease the inside with a spray or butter.  I don’t do the oil or butter thing.  Instead, I take my tin foil, and cut off just enough to cover the cake tin with an overlap of around 2 inches. I then do the same with Baking Paper.

A cover to stop cakes from burning that won't stick.
A cover to stop cakes from burning that won’t stick

Then I go around the edges crimping the foil to hold the baking paper inside. As a liner, like the photo above. You’ll end up with a shower cap arrangement that won’t stick to your cake (on the baking paper side). You can also reuse it over and over until it gets dirty.

Shower cap cake cover and mould.
Shower cap cake cover and mould

So what does this do for you?  It stops the top of the cake from browning too much (or burning), and it sort of steams the cake, locking in the moisture.

When to use the show cap cake cover

You can either pop it on at the start and remove it 3/4 way through the cooking, so it browns nicely during the last stage of baking. Or pop it on when you think it’s brown enough. Be careful; either way, you’ll be working with a hot cake and tin.   This works particularly well for cakes that take a long time to bake. The tinfoil is a great idea (providing you’ve not got the really light cheaper stuff) because the weight will keep it down if you fold over the edges.

Foil covered cake mould.
Foil covered cake mould.
Blackberry ripple loaf sliced on a white plate

Blackberry loaf – Conventional Method

5 from 2 votes

5 stars tells us you love the recipe

becs-table.com.au
This blackberry ripple loaf (conventional method) is pretty easy to make, and can use any type of berry or a mix.
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Total Time 1 hour 15 minutes
Difficulty Easy
Course Afternoon Tea, Morning Tea, Snack or Dessert
Cuisine British
Servings 12
Method Conventional

Equipment

  • 1 Stand mixer

Ingredients
  

  • 1 1/2 cups frozen blackberries thawed
  • 250 g butter softened
  • 125 g caster sugar
  • 2 tsp finely grated orange rind
  • 3 eggs
  • 125 g self-raising flour
  • 125 g plain flour
  • 2/3 cup milk
  • 1/3 cup flaked almonds
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • Icing sugar for dusting

Instructions
 

  • Preheat oven to 180C/160C fan-forced.
  • Grease a 6cm-deep, 11cm x 21cm loaf pan. Line base and sides with baking paper, extending paper 2cm above all edges.
  • Place blackberries in a bowl. Using a fork, roughly mash, keeping some whole.
  • Using an electric mixer, beat the butter, sugar and orange rind for 5 minutes or until light and fluffy. Add the eggs, 1 at a time, beating until just combined after each addition then stir in flours and milk, alternating in two batches.
  • Spoon 1/3 of the batter into prepared pan, spreading to level. Using a slotted spoon, top with 1/2 the berries, straining any excess liquid. Using a butter knife, swirl the berries into the batter. Don't do too much or you won't see the lovely pattern. Repeat with 1/2 the remaining batter and remaining berries. Spoon remaining batter on top. Level top. Sprinkle with almonds and a tsp of sugar. Bake for 1 hour or until the loaf is golden and firm to touch. If it starts to brown too much on top see my tips above.
  • Stand in pan for 5 minutes. Transfer loaf to a wire rack to cool. Serve, dusted with icing sugar.
Blackberry ripple loaf sliced on a white plate

Blackberry loaf – Thermomix Method

5 from 1 vote

5 stars tells us you love the recipe

becs-table.com.au
This blackberry ripple loaf (Thermomix method) is easy to make, and can use any type of berry or a mix.
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Total Time 1 hour 15 minutes
Difficulty Easy
Course Afternoon Tea, Dessert, Morning Tea
Cuisine British
Servings 12
Method Thermomix

Equipment

  • 1 Thermomix

Ingredients
  

  • 1 1/2 cups frozen blackberries thawed
  • 250 g butter chilled cubes
  • 125 g caster sugar
  • 2 tsp finely grated orange rind
  • 3 eggs
  • 125 g self-raising flour
  • 125 g plain flour
  • 160 g milk
  • 1/3 cup flaked almonds
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • Icing sugar for dusting

Instructions
 

  • Preheat oven to 180C/160C fan-forced.
  • Grease a 6cm-deep, 11cm x 21cm loaf pan. Line base and sides with baking paper, extending paper 2cm above all edges.
  • Place blackberries in a bowl. Using a fork, roughly mash, keeping some whole.
  • Weigh the cold cubed butter into the TM bowl and mix for 30sec/speed 6.
  • Weigh in the sugar and grated orange rind and mix for 10 seconds/speed 6 remove the lid lift the mix from the base and scrape down then inster the butterfly.
  • Sit a small bowl on top of your TM and weigh your SR flour and Plain Flour in it and set aside.
  • Set the TM to speed 3, add the eggs in a steady slow stream or one at a time, half way through add a heaped tablespoon of the flour that you have set aside then continue adding the remainder of the egg.
  • Weigh the milk into a small jug and have it and the flour at the ready. Set the TM to speed 3, then slowly, while the blades are running, add the ingredients through the hole in the lid. Start with 1/2 the flour, then 1/2 the milk, then the last of the flour and the last of the milk.
    Remove the lid and scrape down. Mix again for a few seconds if needed.
  • Spoon 1/3 of the batter into the prepared pan, spreading to level. Using a slotted spoon, top with 1/2 the berries, straining any excess liquid. Using a butter knife, swirl the berries into the batter. Don't do too much or you won't see the lovely pattern. Repeat with 1/2 the remaining batter and remaining berries. Spoon remaining batter on top. Level top. Sprinkle with almonds and a tsp of sugar. Bake
  • Bake for 1 hour or until the loaf is golden and firm to touch. If it starts to brown too much on top see my tips above.Stand in pan for 5 minutes. Transfer loaf to a wire rack to cool. Serve, dusted with icing sugar.

Want to know more?

We have loads of loaves. Click here to see more recipes for loaves.

3 Comments

    1. I’ll write it up for you Kylie. This is how I would do it, but I’ve not had a chance to test it yet, although I’m pretty confident it will be fine. Will add berries to my shopping list. 😉

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