Turkish delight with a difference

It seems that when this recipe was moved over from my old site some of it got a little mixed up.  If you scroll down to the bottom of this post you will see my updated version on what I did.

Pear Lokum (Pear Delight)
Olive oil spray
860 g caster sugar
1 liter water
2 Tbs fresh lemon juice
3 Tbs gelatine powder
130 g cornflour
1 tsp cream of tartar
2 tsp Pear essence or reduced pear syrup (I used reduced pear syrup)
dehydrated pear slices
300 g icing sugar mixture

Spray a square 20cm (base measurement) cake pan with olive oil spray to grease.

Line the base and side with non-stick baking paper, allowing the sides to overhang.
Place the sugar and 500ml (2 cups) of the water in a large heavy-based saucepan over low heat and stir until the sugar dissolves.

Place a sugar thermometer in the pan. Increase heat to medium. Cook, without stirring, brushing down the side of the pan occasionally with a pastry brush dipped in water this will take about 25 minutes or until the sugar thermometer reaches 125°C. Stir in the lemon juice.
Meanwhile, place the gelatine, cornflour and cream of tartar in a large saucepan. Use a balloon whisk to whisk in a little of the remaining water to form a paste. Gradually whisk in the remaining water.

Place over mediumheat and cook, stirring, for 3-5 minutes or until the mixture boils and thickens.
let it cool a bit then gradually pour the sugar syrup into the cornflour mixture, whisking constantly (if the mixture becomes lumpy, pour through a fine sieve into another saucepan).
Reduce heat to low. Place the sugar thermometer in the saucepan. Simmer, stirring occasionally to prevent the mixture sticking to the base of the pan, for 1 hour or until the mixture is light golden and sugarthermometer reaches 110°C. Add the pear syrup or essence and a few drops of the food colouring (if using) and stir until well combined. Pour the mixture into the prepared pan.
Set aside to cool to room temperature and place in the fridge for 4hours or overnight until firm.
Pour the icing sugar mixture onto a large chopping board. Turn the lokum onto the icing sugar and use a lightly greased knife to cut into 3cmpieces.
Toss the lokum in the icing sugar to coat. Serve.

Cooking Tip: Cooking Tip: You will need a sugar thermometer for this recipe.
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Pear Lokum (Pear Delight)
Olive oil spray
860 g caster sugar
1 liter water
2 Tbs fresh lemon juice
3 Tbs gelatine powder
130 g cornflour
1 tsp cream of tartar
2 Tablespoons Pear concentrate
dehydrated pear slices for garnish
300 g icing sugar mixture

By Hand Method

1. Prepare a 9×9 pan by lining it with aluminum foil and spraying the foil with nonstick cooking spray. Set aside for now. Or grease a silicon tray with oil.

2. Place the sugar, lemon juice, and 500g of the water in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Stir until the sugar dissolves, and bring the mixture to a boil. Brush down the sides of the pan with a wet pastry brush to prevent sugar crystals from forming, and insert a candy thermometer.

3. Allow the sugar mixture to continue boiling, without stirring, until it reaches 130c on the candy thermometer.  Occasionally brush down the sides with water as it goes.

4. When the sugar syrup is around 110c, begin to get the rest of the candy ingredients prepared. Place the remaining water in another, slightly larger, saucepan. Add the gelatin, cornstarch and cream of tartar, whisk until the starch dissolves and there are no lumps. Place the saucepan over medium heat and bring the mixture to a boil, stirring or whisking constantly. The mixture will become thick and pasty.

5. Once the sugar syrup is at 130c, remove it from the heat. Slowly, carefully, pour it into the cornstarch mixture, whisking until it is fully incorporated.

6. Reduce the heat to low and simmer, whisking it every 8-10 minutes, for about an hour, until the candy has turned a light golden-yellow color and is very thick and gluey.

7. After an hour, remove from the heat and stir in the food coloring and the rosewater. Pour the candy into the prepared pan and allow it to set, uncovered, overnight.

8. The next day, remove the candy from the pan using the foil as handles. Dust your work station with the powdered sugar, and flip the candy onto the powdered sugar. Remove the foil from the back and dust the top with the sugar. Use an oiled chef’s knife to cut the Turkish Delight into small squares. Dust each side of the square with powdered sugar to prevent stickiness.

9. Turkish Delight is best soon after it is made. It doesn’t keep very well, but if you want to try keeping it, store it in an airtight container with waxed paper between the layers, and dust the sides with powdered sugar again before serving.

 

By Thermomix method

1. Prepare a 9×9 pan by lining it with aluminum foil and spraying the foil with nonstick cooking spray. Set aside for now. Or grease a silicon tray with oil.

2. Place the sugar, lemon juice, and 500g of the water in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Stir until the sugar dissolves, and bring the mixture to a boil. Brush down the sides of the pan with a wet pastry brush to prevent sugar crystals from forming, and insert a candy thermometer.

3. Allow the sugar mixture to continue boiling, without stirring, until it reaches 130c on the candy thermometer.  Occasionally brush down the sides with water as it goes.

4. When the sugar syrup is around 110c, begin to get the rest of the candy ingredients prepared. Place the remaining water, gelatin, cornstarch and cream of tartar in the TM bowl, stir on speed 2 till incorporated. Pop in the butterfly and whisk until the starch dissolves and there are no lumps. Set the temp to 100c speed 2 for 6 mins the mix will become thick and pasty.

5. Once the sugar syrup is at 130c, remove it from the heat. Slowly, carefully, whilst the blades are turning on speed 1 drizzle through the hole in the lid.

6. Set the temp to 90 c for 60 mins speed 1.

7. After an hour, remove from the heat and stir in the food coloring and the flavour. Pour the candy into the prepared pan and allow it to set, uncovered, overnight.

8. The next day, remove the candy from the pan using the foil as handles. Dust your work station with the powdered sugar, and flip the candy onto the powdered sugar. Remove the foil from the back and dust the top with the sugar. Use an oiled chef’s knife to cut the Turkish Delight into small squares. Dust each side of the square with powdered sugar to prevent stickiness.

9. Turkish Delight is best soon after it is made. It doesn’t keep very well, but if you want to try keeping it, store it in an airtight container with waxed paper between the layers, and dust the sides with powdered sugar again before serving

 

 

 

Author: Bec

Chef/Patissier

4 thoughts on “Turkish delight with a difference”

  1. How quickly does this set once removed from heat? I want to use this as a filling to encase in chocolate in silicone moulds. Is it possible to let it cool enough to not melt the chocolate & then pour into mould & refrigerate, or does it set too quickly to do that?
    Thanks 🙂

    1. Hi Cassie,

      No, this is an over night, cool and set type recipe. If you poured this onto chocolate it would melt it I’m afraid. There is a new recipe on the “Thermomix community” site here in Australia. You could get on to that and ask them the same question. Hope you find a way. Sounds like fun.

  2. Well, I spooned the Turkish delight into the chocolate moulds after letting it cool for maybe 10 minutes (it was still hot, but warm on the surface). I should have done 3-4 layers of chocolate before putting it in, but I couldn’t be bothered. It worked! Even with 1 thin layer, whilst it melted the chocolate when it was put in, it didn’t damage the chocolate shell at all. I’ve only tasted one & it was divine. I need to control myself & save the rest for Easter gifts!
    I did have a small distaster, I did not have enough cornflour on hand. So had to leave the pot boiling, but turned it down, whilst I ran to the shops & bought some more cornflour. Impressed it still worked!

    1. That’s great Cassie. LoL having to run to the shops. You could probably have left it off it should have dissolved with the warmth of turning back on. But I am so glad they worked. Might have to give it a try myself. Sounds very yummy.

Love to hear from you!